Scuba diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas, Part 3

Benoit_Raoul__tiger_shark_tiger_beach

Today we return to scuba diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas, Part 3.   The tiger-like striped pattern, with which the hunter can easily be recognized, fades with age. Divers who encounter a tiger shark should not panic. The dangerous animal is rather shy and reserved toward divers. As a rule, you can keep the shark in check with a stick or a large camera, but you must have good nerves. In particular, don’t let the shark push you toward the water surface—the so-called death zone. There, the tiger shark loses…

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Scuba diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas Part 2

We return to Scuba diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas Part 2. Part 1 can be found here. The news that the first tiger shark is now swimming below has disconcerted everyone at the lunch table. Now it’s a frantic rush onto the dive deck of the Bye Polar, because this is the moment all the guests have waited for. The dive crowd on the platform is curious, and everyone’s eyes are searching. Only the silhouettes of the lemon sharks are clearly visible. Fifteen or more might be there now. A…

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Scuba diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas Part 1

diving on Tiger Beach, Bahamas

When Tiger Beach is ON—it’s the world’s greatest shark dive. —Eli Martinez, Shark Diver Magazine I kneel on the ground of a sandbar at a six meter depth (19 ft) in the Bahamas crystal clear water, visibility approaches about 30 meters (98 ft). In front of me are roughly 20 lemon sharks. With a length of about three meters (10 ft), the lemons are quite impressive. When you dive with them for the first time, you might feel a bit uncomfortable, because these sharks do not know anything like a…

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Blind Lemon Shark Head-butts Diver

Michael Dornellas recently had a unique shark encounter in the Bahamas. The thirty-one-year-old was head-butted by a blind lemon shark. The encounter occurred while he was filming videos with friend at Tiger Beach, a popular diving spot. The area is known to host a large population of tiger sharks, and has been featured in a variety of episodes during Shark Week. Dornellas was recording himself while he was free diving to the sandy bottom. As he was taking in his surroundings he was unaware of the blind shark swimming toward…

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Shark News From Around the Globe 03/01/16

We begin this edition of shark news from around the globe with a visit to the Bahamas. Researchers from the University of New England and the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have been studying female tiger sharks at Tiger Beach in the Bahamas. In an effort to determine if the sharks were mature and pregnant, the group not only used visual cues such as mating scars, but also hormone blood tests and ultra sound. Professor James Sulikowski of the University of New England’s Department of…

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